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Facts and myths about tap water

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Facts and myths about tap water Cofnij Rozmiar czcionki Drukuj

Facts

Myths


YOU CAN DRINK TAP WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST

Water in Krakow taps is free from bacteria, so boiling it is not necessary. High temperature only kills microorganisms which have already been removed from tap water.


HARD WATER MAY CAUSE Formation of STONES TO FORM IN THE Human Body

Stones form in the human body mainly as a result of metabolic disorders, regardless of the hardness of water consumed. Stones in the human body are deposits of insoluble oxalates.


BOILING SOFTENS WATER

Boiling water causes some of the minerals – in particular calcium and magnesium compounds – to precipitate in the form of a deposit (scale). This softens the water but also impoverishes its mineral composition. For this reason it is not recommended to boil water for drinking.
 


CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS FORMED AS A RESULT OF CHLORINATION ARE DANGEROUS BECAUSE THEY ACCUMULATE IN THE BODY (DUE TO long term DRINKING OF TAP WATER)

By-products of water disinfection do not accumulate in the human body , and moreover  their concentration in water is strictly monitored and never exceeds permissible limits so they are completely safe.

THE QUALITY OF WATER IN KRAKoW TAPS IS THE SAME AS IN OTHER EU COUNTRIES

Water fsupplied by our company is of the same high quality as in other European cities because the quality requirements laid down in Polish regulations are as stringent as EU requirements, and some indicators must meet standards even more rigorous than those laid down by the EU laws.

 


cHLORINE IN TAP WATER IS HARMFUL

Chlorine is a disinfectant which guarantees the microbiological safety of water. The doses of chlorine used in tap water have no harmful effects.

 
Ikon of scientist Grandpa Tadek.

It was the water systems supplying water
disinfected with chlorine that stopped devastating epidemics in the last century, thus extending the average life expectancy to a level unprecedented in human history.